Housing Element

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In order to create a plan that represents the values and priorities of the community, we need to hear from you!

The City of Lafayette is updating its Housing Element, which defines where and what kind of housing that Lafayette residents want to see over the next 8 years. The plan identifies existing and projected housing needs to preserve, improve, and develop housing for all economic segments of the community. As part of the update, community members will consider housing needs in relation to other General Plan elements, like transportation and parks and open space. Make sure to visit PlanLafayette.org to find more information on the Housing Element update and hear about meetings.

The City will be updating this page with a variety of activities to get different kinds of input. All input received from this platform will be considered by the General Plan Advisory Committee, who will be putting together the draft goals, programs, and policies in response to the Community's priorities and forwarding a recommendation to the Planning Commission and City Council.

Your feedback is critical to this process, so please take some time to complete a survey, watch a video, or leave your ideas for others to explore!

Timeline for Housing Element Community Engagement


Use the section headers below to explore different activities!

In order to create a plan that represents the values and priorities of the community, we need to hear from you!

The City of Lafayette is updating its Housing Element, which defines where and what kind of housing that Lafayette residents want to see over the next 8 years. The plan identifies existing and projected housing needs to preserve, improve, and develop housing for all economic segments of the community. As part of the update, community members will consider housing needs in relation to other General Plan elements, like transportation and parks and open space. Make sure to visit PlanLafayette.org to find more information on the Housing Element update and hear about meetings.

The City will be updating this page with a variety of activities to get different kinds of input. All input received from this platform will be considered by the General Plan Advisory Committee, who will be putting together the draft goals, programs, and policies in response to the Community's priorities and forwarding a recommendation to the Planning Commission and City Council.

Your feedback is critical to this process, so please take some time to complete a survey, watch a video, or leave your ideas for others to explore!

Timeline for Housing Element Community Engagement


Use the section headers below to explore different activities!

Discussions: All (1) Open (1)
  • What aspects of Lafayette do you value?

    4 months ago
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    Use this space to connect!  Share your thoughts and ideas by adding a new comment or responding to a post. The conversation on this forum will be used by the GPAC to understand community preferences and inform the recommendations it sends to the City Council and Planning Commission for consideration.

    What aspects of Lafayette do you value? Shared values are a major component of what defines a community and understanding what makes Lafayette a livable city is a key part of the Housing Element update. The General Plan Advisory Committee (GPAC) is looking to you to define the values shared by the Lafayette community that will help to shape the policy direction and physical form of the city over the next 20 years.

    What does “livable” mean to you? A livable city means different things to different people and what you might consider ideal characteristics of a place will also likely change with time. Nonetheless, there are likely many shared preferred characteristics that define any good neighborhood.  This is an opportunity to discuss how Lafayette can continue to be a place called home for current and future residents!

    Let’s talk! Some questions you might consider to get the conversation started include:

    1. What do you think are the 3 most important things to see in Lafayette's future?

    2. What do you love about Lafayette and how can we encourage more of it? 

    3. What is missing from your neighborhood? 

    4. How might certain issues, like addressing climate change or promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion, manifest in the built environment?

    Below are some suggested concepts around livability to help you think about and talk about what you value:


    Livability Concept

          Examples

    MIXED USE

    • Commercial and retail space combined with multifamily housing in one building or one parcel

    • Transit-oriented development (TOD) - places designed to bring people, activities, buildings, and public space together, with easy walking and cycling connection between them and near-excellent transit service

    • A variety of goods and services useful to residents. 


    HOUSING
    • Diverse housing options (single family residences, apartments, townhomes, accessory dwelling units, etc.)

    • Development that blends with single family neighborhoods

    • Quality, affordable homes of various sizes, forms and features with a range of options regarding numbers of bedrooms, outdoor living spaces and other green space.


    COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT
    • Small, locally-owned stores

    • Corner shops, occupied storefronts, and shops on the first floor of developments in the downtown

    • Buildings, signage and uses that are attractive and support the needs of residents


    PUBLIC SPACES

    • Human-scaled design that entices interaction.

    • Gathering places with seating, tables, greenery, shops, cafes, street life and activities

    • Parks, courtyards or other improved public space Downtown possibly with connections to neighborhoods


    INFRASTRUCTURE
    • Facilities like roads, transit, sewer, water and power to serve existing and new development.

    • Ecologically sound green infrastructure by government and by individuals (e.g. flood and wildfire mitigation).

    • Pedestrian and bike infrastructure to encourage alternatives to private vehicles.


    DEVELOPMENT FORM
    • High quality aesthetic and functional design for buildings and public spaces. 

    • Connective routes for pedestrians and cyclists.

    • Infill development on undeveloped or under-developed land


    LIFESTYLE
    • Cultural elements like arts, entertainment and cuisine.

    • Small-town atmosphere (affordable, comfortable, clean, easy to get around, welcoming, quaint).

    • Use of outdoor living spaces, outdoor dining and outdoor recreational opportunities.


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