Housing Element

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The City initiated its update to the Housing Element of the General Plan at the end of 2020 and undertook significant community engagement and research to develop a draft Housing Element to submit to the CA Dept. of Housing and Community Development (HCD). HCD is the agency that reviews and approves (or “certifies”) this local housing plan. The General Plan Advisory Committee (GPAC) used a variety of outreach methods to engage as broad a population as possible to inform the City’s plan. GPAC held nearly a dozen workshops and heard from over one thousand community members. Thank you to all the community members who took the time to participate and provide your feedback on this important undertaking!

GPAC developed a complete draft of the updated Housing Element, which the body forwarded to Planning Commission in January 2022. The Commission provided comments and suggestions and forwarded the draft to the City Council. After several meetings reviewing the draft, the Council recommended staff submit the first draft to the State.

At the end of September 2022, the City received a comment letter from HCD outlining changes needed to find the document in compliance with State Housing Element law. Staff and consultants worked to address the comments and presented a draft to the Planning Commission in early 2023, which the Planning Commission recommended for approval. On January 23, 2023, the Council considered the revised draft Housing Element and adopted resolutions certifying the Environmental Impact Report and adopting the updated Housing Element.

Use the links below to review the documents:


The City initiated its update to the Housing Element of the General Plan at the end of 2020 and undertook significant community engagement and research to develop a draft Housing Element to submit to the CA Dept. of Housing and Community Development (HCD). HCD is the agency that reviews and approves (or “certifies”) this local housing plan. The General Plan Advisory Committee (GPAC) used a variety of outreach methods to engage as broad a population as possible to inform the City’s plan. GPAC held nearly a dozen workshops and heard from over one thousand community members. Thank you to all the community members who took the time to participate and provide your feedback on this important undertaking!

GPAC developed a complete draft of the updated Housing Element, which the body forwarded to Planning Commission in January 2022. The Commission provided comments and suggestions and forwarded the draft to the City Council. After several meetings reviewing the draft, the Council recommended staff submit the first draft to the State.

At the end of September 2022, the City received a comment letter from HCD outlining changes needed to find the document in compliance with State Housing Element law. Staff and consultants worked to address the comments and presented a draft to the Planning Commission in early 2023, which the Planning Commission recommended for approval. On January 23, 2023, the Council considered the revised draft Housing Element and adopted resolutions certifying the Environmental Impact Report and adopting the updated Housing Element.

Use the links below to review the documents:


Discussions: All (1) Open (1)
  • What aspects of Lafayette do you value?

    about 2 years ago
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    Use this space to connect!  Share your thoughts and ideas by adding a new comment or responding to a post. The conversation on this forum will be used by the GPAC to understand community preferences and inform the recommendations it sends to the City Council and Planning Commission for consideration.

    What aspects of Lafayette do you value? Shared values are a major component of what defines a community and understanding what makes Lafayette a livable city is a key part of the Housing Element update. The General Plan Advisory Committee (GPAC) is looking to you to define the values shared by the Lafayette community that will help to shape the policy direction and physical form of the city over the next 20 years.

    What does “livable” mean to you? A livable city means different things to different people and what you might consider ideal characteristics of a place will also likely change with time. Nonetheless, there are likely many shared preferred characteristics that define any good neighborhood.  This is an opportunity to discuss how Lafayette can continue to be a place called home for current and future residents!

    Let’s talk! Some questions you might consider to get the conversation started include:

    1. What do you think are the 3 most important things to see in Lafayette's future?

    2. What do you love about Lafayette and how can we encourage more of it? 

    3. What is missing from your neighborhood? 

    4. How might certain issues, like addressing climate change or promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion, manifest in the built environment?

    Below are some suggested concepts around livability to help you think about and talk about what you value:


    Livability Concept

          Examples

    MIXED USE

    • Commercial and retail space combined with multifamily housing in one building or one parcel

    • Transit-oriented development (TOD) - places designed to bring people, activities, buildings, and public space together, with easy walking and cycling connection between them and near-excellent transit service

    • A variety of goods and services useful to residents. 


    HOUSING
    • Diverse housing options (single family residences, apartments, townhomes, accessory dwelling units, etc.)

    • Development that blends with single family neighborhoods

    • Quality, affordable homes of various sizes, forms and features with a range of options regarding numbers of bedrooms, outdoor living spaces and other green space.


    COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT
    • Small, locally-owned stores

    • Corner shops, occupied storefronts, and shops on the first floor of developments in the downtown

    • Buildings, signage and uses that are attractive and support the needs of residents


    PUBLIC SPACES

    • Human-scaled design that entices interaction.

    • Gathering places with seating, tables, greenery, shops, cafes, street life and activities

    • Parks, courtyards or other improved public space Downtown possibly with connections to neighborhoods


    INFRASTRUCTURE
    • Facilities like roads, transit, sewer, water and power to serve existing and new development.

    • Ecologically sound green infrastructure by government and by individuals (e.g. flood and wildfire mitigation).

    • Pedestrian and bike infrastructure to encourage alternatives to private vehicles.


    DEVELOPMENT FORM
    • High quality aesthetic and functional design for buildings and public spaces. 

    • Connective routes for pedestrians and cyclists.

    • Infill development on undeveloped or under-developed land


    LIFESTYLE
    • Cultural elements like arts, entertainment and cuisine.

    • Small-town atmosphere (affordable, comfortable, clean, easy to get around, welcoming, quaint).

    • Use of outdoor living spaces, outdoor dining and outdoor recreational opportunities.


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Page last updated: 03 Apr 2023, 10:19 AM